Coverage of Workers’ Compensation

You can get injured in the workplace because of a variety of reasons. Maybe you work in a construction site and you have fallen into an unattended hole. Maybe you work in an office and you have slipped because of leaks in the air conditioner. Wherever you work, you are not safe from the dangers of workplace accidents and injuries.

It is a good thing that there is workers’ compensation, where companies give monetary compensation to make up for the damages the person has sustained while under employment. This is also a good way for employers to protect themselves, because employees typically cannot sue them if they are under workers’ compensation insurance.
But what exactly does this insurance cover? It can cover a variety of things, such as treatment costs of the injury that the employee has sustained, but the things it covers may vary depending on the jurisdiction and its laws.

Aside from the medical costs, workers’ compensation can cover salary replacements, but the coverage is typically not a hundred percent, but a significant percentage of the employee’s salary. According to the website of Scudder & Hedrick, PLLC, disability claims can either be temporary or permanent. These classifications refer to the type of injury and how this injury can affect the victim’s working capacity. The severity of the disability claims is a major factor in the salary replacement computation.

This insurance can also cover retraining costs. The employee may be out of work long enough to warrant retraining, or he or she may have missed or lost job-related knowledge and skills because of the injury or illness that has been sustained.

Workers’ compensation is a good way to ensure that the employees are not going to take a significant financial hit if they are hurt. This is particularly helpful for those who work on hazardous environments, such as construction sites and factories. The small downside is that these employees may not be able to sue their employers for their negligence. However, these employees can waive their workers’ compensation insurance if they really want to take their employers to court.

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